Contaminated Chicken Salad Poisons 400 People

For many, a well-cooked meal at a restaurant of choice is one of life’s great pleasures. Such venues are used for celebrations. In fact, many of life’s “big events” from weddings to graduation parties and even funerals are punctuated by specially prepared food.

What happens when the chiefs and staff are unhygienic? What if things go awry in the kitchen? When you think about it, we place an extraordinary amount of trust in the people who prepare our food. Often we take it on faith that the employees are washing their hands or that the many unhygienic pests that are attracted to kitchens are successfully kept at bay. For companies that mass produce food that is shipped out nationwide, this responsibility is even more important. In late February of 2018, Triple T Specialty Meats, Inc. failed in their responsibilities.

Mass Salmonella Poisoning

On February 21, 2018 Triple T Specialty Meats had to recall all of its chicken salad products that it produced that winter. The chicken salad was contaminated with the dreaded Salmonella Typhimurium. These infected salads were distributed all over the United States, including Illinois. Nearly 400 people were poisoned in this negligent disaster. Out of this group, roughly 100 were hospitalized, and sadly one person died as a result of their food poisoning.

Salmonella

Salmonella contaminations are a common type of poisoning in the United States. Every year roughly a million people are diagnosed with salmonella poisoning, and out of this number, 450 will die from exposure. Salmonella bacteria is usually found in animals, but occasionally humans may carry it, as well. Raw and uncooked animal products (eggs, meats, etc) may contain salmonella bacteria.

Symptoms of infection may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headaches, cramps, loss of appetite, and fever. These symptoms usually last between four to seven days, and they typically go away on their own (that is without treatment). Bowel activities may be out of sorts for several months after an infection, and severe cases may even result in a rare form of temporary arthritis that can lead to permanent arthritis.

Often times being diagnosed with salmonella may be tricky as the bacteria is usually gone by the time blood results come back from a doctor’s lab. You should call a doctor if you believe that you have eaten contaminated food. If symptoms are present, it is recommended that you drink plenty of water. If symptoms persist beyond seven days or you have blood in your stools, you should seek medical attention immediately.

Have You Been the Victim of Food Poisoning? Get Legal Help

Salmonella poisoning can be painful and deadly. This type of poisoning can be mean time off work and nearly a week of painful symptoms. If you have been exposed to salmonella, you should seek medical attention immediately. Once you are able, please contact our firm and let us help you. We have legal professionals waiting to chat with you on our website 24 hours a day or you could call us and set up a consultation. We serve clients in the Arlington Heights, Palatine, Rolling Meadows, Libertyville, Mundelein, Buffalo Grove, Schaumburg, Elk Grove, and Itasca areas.

(image courtesy of Mai Moeslund)

  • Newland & Newland LLP, Attorneys, Arlington Heights, IL
  • Lawyer.com