Recall

What Should I do if My Medication is Recalled?

When a drug on the market is determined to be dangerous in some way, it may be recalled. This can be because the drug was not advertised properly, because a specific batch or all of the drug available is contaminated or compromised, new side effects are discovered, or because the drug in the packages on the market is not the drug labeled on the packages. If a drug you currently take is recalled, stop taking it and contact your healthcare provider or local pharmacy for further instruction.
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Recent Listeria Recalls

Some types of food poisoning are more common than others. For example, you tend to hear more reports of Listeria and Salmonella outbreaks than Campylobacter and Shigellosis. Although you might feel like you hear about Listeria every other week, do not brush it off as unimportant.
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FDA Consent Decree Halts Most Sales of Infusion Pump

The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced this week that the agency has filed a consent decree against a medical device manufacturer for repeatedly failing to correct identified violations related to an implantable drug infusion pump. A consent decree is a type of legal settlement in which the manufacturer agrees to follow the court-ordered directives without acknowledgement of fault or guilt.
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Nationwide Recall for Compounded Drugs from North Carolina Pharmacy

A state inspection of a pharmacy in Fayetteville, North Carolina, has led to the recall of more than 600 drugs in a variety of dosages and formulations, officials announced in late March. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the North Carolina Board of Pharmacy (NCBOP) have issued a warning to medical professionals and patients regarding all compounded drugs made or distributed by the Prescription Center pharmacy, which has been since shut down. Compounded Drug Recall
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Understanding Medical Device and Drug Recalls

When discussing the safety of medical devices or prescription drugs, it is not uncommon to hear about various recalls and safety alerts being issued. The announcement of a safety recall by manufacturers or government regulators may seem extremely ominous, but it is important to understand that a recall does not necessarily mean a product cannot be used at all.
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Defective Wheelchair Lifts Sold Even After Recall

Defective medical devices are not limited to those implanted in a patient’s body. Patients who must use canes, wheelchairs, or other devices to get around are susceptible to a whole array of device warnings and risks that other Americans are not.
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Enrollment Process Open in Mass Tort Stryker Settlement

It has been several years since Michigan-based medical device manufacturer Stryker issued a voluntary recall of their Rejuvenate and ABH II modular-neck stem metal hip replacements, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The recall was made after many patients complained that the hip replacement was defective, causing them more pain and suffering than before the implant was surgically inserted.
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The Return of Fen-Phen Pills

The product first hailed as a miracle weight-loss drug and subsequently pulled from the market when its dangers became apparent has resurfaced, albeit in another format. But the new drug has some of the same health concerns, and some new ones as well. Fen-Phen
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Supreme Court Ruling Makes It Difficult To Sue Manufacturers

Last year, a Supreme Court ruling came down that will affect thousands of Americans, even if they were not aware of the ruling. Building on a ruling that declared manufacturers of medical devices could, in some cases, enjoy immunity status if the device turned out to be defective, last year’s case determined that no patient could challenge a manufacturer in state court if it had been approved at the federal level.
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Invasive Procedure Equipment Causes Big Problems When Contaminated

With cancer rates at an all-time high and cancer remaining a leading cause of death in the United States, the word biopsy has become a household term.  A biopsy, according to WebMD, is the examination of a contaminated tissue that was removed from the body to determine what disease—or to what extent the disease is present—is afflicting a patient. A patient will undergo a biopsy if he or she has abnormal test results or if a medical practitioner suspects that it could identify an unidentified condition.
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  • Newland & Newland LLP, Attorneys, Arlington Heights, IL
  • Lawyer.com