defective product lawyer

Dangers and Severe Risks of Lisinopril

Most drugs used to treat chronic issues dealing with digestion or heart issues carry some risk of side effects, but some are worse than others. Lisinopril is a angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, used to treat congestive heart failure, hypertension, and reduce the risk of heart attack. It has been commonly prescribed since the FDA first approved it for patient use in the early 1990s.
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Supreme Court Ruling Makes It Difficult To Sue Manufacturers

Last year, a Supreme Court ruling came down that will affect thousands of Americans, even if they were not aware of the ruling. Building on a ruling that declared manufacturers of medical devices could, in some cases, enjoy immunity status if the device turned out to be defective, last year’s case determined that no patient could challenge a manufacturer in state court if it had been approved at the federal level.
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Risk of Blood Clotting with Birth Control Still an Issue

Thrombosis, or blood clots as they are colloquially known, tend to manifest naturally in men more than women. Women, however, are at risk for blood clots primarily because of pregnancy, birth control, and other hormonal therapies men do not generally take, according to StopTheClot.org.
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Invasive Procedure Equipment Causes Big Problems When Contaminated

With cancer rates at an all-time high and cancer remaining a leading cause of death in the United States, the word biopsy has become a household term.  A biopsy, according to WebMD, is the examination of a contaminated tissue that was removed from the body to determine what disease—or to what extent the disease is present—is afflicting a patient. A patient will undergo a biopsy if he or she has abnormal test results or if a medical practitioner suspects that it could identify an unidentified condition.
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Tylenol (Acetaminophen) Use and Liver Failure

Acetaminophen is one of the most common pain medications in the world. Johnson & Johnson manufactures the most well known brand of pain medication that contains acetaminophen, Tylenol. While many people consider Tylenol to be a very safe, over-the-counter drug, according to MedicinePlus, a publication of the National Institute of Health (NIH), acetaminophen overdose “is one of the most common poisonings worldwide.” It can be deadly if a person takes too large of a dose, according to NIH.
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Lawsuits Brought Against Eli Lilly, Manufacturer of Cymbalta

Cymbalta is a multi-use prescription drug most commonly used as an anti-depressant. Despite several clinical trials during the approval process of Cymbalta that alleged Cymbalta caused depression in otherwise healthy patients, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration did not recall the drug for use as an anti-depressant, according to the New York Times.
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A Recall Issued For Yaz Was Not Publicized

Sometimes prominent drugs are recalled and no one knows about it. This was the case with a 2010 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recall of the birth control Yaz, a contraceptive approved by the FDA for use among women as young as 14 years old. Yaz and Beyaz—a similar FDA-approved medication made by the same manufacturer, Berlex, Inc.—hit the market when it was approved in 2006, according to Drugs.com.
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Lawsuits Brought Against Xarelto for Internal Bleeding

Xarelto is a blood thinner prescribed to patients at high risk of blood clots or strokes and is widely prescribed by the medical community. It can also be used to treat pulmonary embolism and can be used to reduce the risk of clotting in a person who has just undergone joint replacement surgery. According to the Xarelto website, more than 9 million people worldwide have been prescribed Xarelto for various reasons.
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Sexual Enhancement Drug Weekend Warrior Contains Harmful Ingredient

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates that drugs are on the market and enforces recalls when enough substandard performance, undeclared ingredient, or adverse side effect reports are received. According to the FDA, “recalls may be conducted on a firm’s own initiative, by FDA request, or by FDA order under statutory authority.” There are three types of FDA recalls—Class I, II, and III. A Class I recall is the most severe, and issued when a product or device is likely to have severe adverse health effects.
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  • Newland & Newland LLP, Attorneys, Arlington Heights, IL
  • Lawyer.com