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Schaumburg prescription medication error lawyer

If you have ever suspected a possible prescription medication error by your doctor or pharmacist, you are not alone. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reports that each year, they receive over 100,000 reports in the United States about suspected medication errors, which pile in from medical professionals, consumers, and drug manufacturers far and wide. Studies have shown that certain populations, such as the elderly and those of low socioeconomic status, are at greater risk of experiencing medication errors, a very serious form of medical malpractice. However, research further reveals that emergency departments are the third most common source for patients receiving incorrect doses or overdoses, placing the general public as a whole at risk.

Prevent Yourself from Becoming a Statistic

With alarming reports of medication errors flooding the news each year, it is only natural for patients in the state of Illinois and nationwide to experience a growing concern about their health and the health of their loved ones. When it comes to protecting your well-being, being a strong advocate of your healthcare is the very best defense against becoming a medical malpractice statistic. Put the following steps into practice to take a proactive approach to protect your health:

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Schaumburg defective drug attorney

Everyone has seen the medicine commercials that read off the laundry list of negative side effects that prescription drugs can have on those who take them. While it is unlikely for a drug to have zero side effects, these potentially dangerous effects should be recognized and mitigated before the drugs are released to the public. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires the completion of clinical trials on new drugs to keep individuals from falling victim to dangerous side effects. However, some pharmaceutical companies have failed to provide the public with the truth about the drugs they manufacture. Defective drugs can cause emotional, physical, and/or psychological injury.

Common Types of Drugs Found to Be Defective

If a drug’s side effects are not properly conveyed to the public, the drug is considered defective. The following are common medications whose negative side effects have deemed them defective on many occasions, resulting in court proceedings for the injured parties:

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Sometimes prominent drugs are recalled and no one knows about it. This was the case with a 2010 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recall of the birth control Yaz, a contraceptive approved by the FDA for use among women as young as 14 years old. Yaz and Beyaz—a similar FDA-approved medication made by the same manufacturer, Berlex, Inc.—hit the market when it was approved in 2006, according to Drugs.com. Beyaz is primarily used to treat acne, while Yaz is marketed as the contraceptive. The only warnings on the Yaz website for either drug alert women who smoke and women over the age of 35 to increased risks of blood clot or stroke when taking the drug.

The trouble for the popular contraceptive came in 2010, when lawsuits started to pop up across the country alleging that women who were on the medication experienced a much higher rate of blood clots than the manufacturer had described. Bayer, the parent company for Yaz, was sued in 1,100 lawsuits that year, according to CBSNews.com. When Bayer began to face these lawsuits, Yaz was its best-selling product, according to CBS. As a result, one may think that a recall of the product would have been widely publicized. Not so.

The FDA issued a recall of the drug in November 2009, but it never made consumer headlines. This regardless of the fact that it “involved 32,856 boxes of Yaz, at three packs per box, and 122,208 boxes of Ocella, an identical product,” reports CBS. Despite its magnitude, the recall was hidden in the “Enforcement Report” section of the FDA website, meaning that anyone who wanted to know about the recall would already have had to know to look there.

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Around the world, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (often called SSRIs) are some of the most commonly prescribed depression medications. In the United States, one of the most popular SSRIs given to patients with depression is Zoloft, which has been linked to dangerous birth defects when taken by pregnant mothers. A new study from the British Medical Journal is the latest authority to lend credence to the risks posed by antidepressants.

The researchers, who reviewed a series of seven studies, found that the risk of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn was different based on the period of the pregnancy in which the mother took the medication. When SSRIs like Zoloft were taken in the later stages of a pregnancy, mothers faced an increased risk that their children would be affected by PPHN.

Although researchers noted that the risk was comparatively low, PPHN is a serious condition that no parent wants to face. In this condition, the baby's lungs are unable to properly exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide. As a result, a newborn could have very low blood oxygen levels, possibly causing damage to organs.

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Posted on in Drugs

A decade ago, Medicare experienced an expansion to make it easier for people to get the drugs that they need. In fact, Congress decided to increase funding to Medicare by billions of dollars to reach this goal. But it is possible that the fix worked too well.

Now Propublica has completed an investigation of this new system and found some interesting safety issues. By reviewing four years of prescription data, they have shown that large quantities of meds were given to Medicare patients without considering the possible side effects. There is also evidence of doctors continually prescribing medicines that they shouldn't according to FDA regulations.

Although Medicaid is good about policing the drugs given to its subscribers, Medicare does not do it at all. According to the director, Jonathan Blum, Medicare concedes to each physician's judgments rather than regulate the prescriptions given to seniors and disabled people.

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